C. S. Lewis on Pride and the Self

C. S. Lewis on Pride and the Self

I’ve recently been obsessed with studying the ego, the self, and how pride works. The more I learn about myself and the bent which defines my fallen humanity, the more I’m equipped to recognize pride and restore the peace of humility in my life. So add this from C. S. Lewis to what Tim Keller says about pride and the self.

If you want to find out how proud you are the easiest way is to ask yourself, ‘How much do I dislike it when other people snub me, or refuse to take any notice of me, or shove their oar in, or patronise me, or show off?’ The point is that each person’s pride is in competition with every one else’s pride. It is because I wanted to be the big noise at the party that I am so annoyed at someone else being the big noise. Two of a trade never agree. Now what you want to get clear is that Pride is essentially competitive—is competitive by its very nature— while the other vices are competitive only, so to speak, by accident. Pride gets no pleasure out of having something, only out of having more of it than the next man. We say that people are proud of being rich, or clever, or good-looking, but they are not. They are proud of being richer, or cleverer, or better-looking than others. If everyone else became equally rich, or clever, or good-looking there would be nothing to be proud about. It is the comparison that makes you proud: the pleasure of being above the rest. Once the element of competition has gone, pride has gone. That is why I say that Pride is essentially competitive in a way the other vices are not. . . . . Greed may drive men into competition if there is not enough to go round; but the proud man, even when he has got more than he can possibly want, will try to get still more just to assert his power. Nearly all those evils in the world which people put down to greed or selfishness are really far more the result of Pride.[1]

He elsewhere connects this prideful frame of mind with the self. It’s ironic that the more we focus on ourselves the less of ourselves we truly become. Only when we look away do we find our true identity, because our identity is with Christ, our Creator and Sustainer.

You will never make a good impression on other people until you stop thinking about what sort of impression you are making. Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring twopence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it… Give up yourself, and you will find your real self.


  1. From Mere Christianity.  ↩

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Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller